Related Courses

Spring 2020

African American History to 1863
This course explores African American history from the Atlantic slave trade up to the Civil War. It is centrally concerned with the rise of and overthrow of human bondage, and how they shaped the modern world. Africans were central to the largest and most profitable forced migration in world history. They shaped new identities and influenced the contours of American politics, law, economics, culture, and society. The course considers the diversity of experiences in this formative period of nation-making. Race, class, gender, region, religion, labor, and resistance animate important themes in the course.
Instructors: Tera W. Hunter
Architecture under the Sign of Catastrophe: Resilience and Resistance
Recurring catastrophe, from earthquakes and eruptions in the pre-industrial era, to the bombing campaigns, tsunamis, and climate changes of the post-atomic present - all now under the sign of the Anthropocene and Global Warming, with attending enforced migrations, conflicts over resources, and political turmoil, have challenged any residual belief in the progressive theories of Modernism. This course examines the ways in which architectural practice and theoretical discourse, has historically responded to catastrophe.
Instructors: Anthony Vidler
Asian American Literature and Culture
This course is an introductory survey of the major works and debates in Asian American literature and culture. We will study a variety of genres--novels, short stories, comics, memoirs, films, and science fiction--to examine how writers treat issues of racial and ethnic identity, gender, queerness, history, memory, colonialism, immigration, technology, and war. By placing Asian American subject formation in relationship to social, economic, and intellectual developments, we will explore the potential of Asian American literary texts to deepen our global and historical understanding of Asians in the U.S. and the U.S. in Asia.
Instructors: Paul Nadal
Black and Asian in America
Debates over policing, immigration, and affirmative action routinely position Black and Asian communities on opposing sides, while the model minority myth has been redeployed in the twenty-first century in the form of the Tiger Mom. How did we get here, and what do these trends mean for our daily lives? We respond to these questions by looking at fiction, film, and foodways from the last 30 years of Black-Asian relations in America. Using a comparative race and ethnic studies approach, we identify ways of thinking and talking about interracial difference that forge new paths for social, cultural, and political engagement.
Instructors: Kinohi Nishikawa
European Politics and Society in the 20th and 21st Centuries
This course covers the critical developments of 20th and 21st century Europe, in particular the consolidation of democracy in European countries and subsequent challenges democracy is facing. It deals with the legacy of the two world wars, Nazism, Stalinism, the Cold War, colonialism and decolonization, the collapse of Communism and the re-unification of Europe, the birth and development of the European Community, the creation of the welfare state, single currency, as well as the problems of immigration, enlargement, the role of various political institutions, including the military, and the recent rise of populism.
Instructors: Marzenna James, Ezra N. Suleiman
Identity, Power, and Policy
This course provides an overview of how identity and power inform public policy in the U.S. and across the globe. Among the topics examined are: immigration and identity dynamics across the globe; identity, psychology, and public policy; questions of race, ethnicity, and group identity in residential segregation; the intersections of identity concerns with drug policies, policing, and sentencing; identity and economic development in Africa and the U.S.; policymaking and Islamic identity; and the ever-evolving identity politics in the U.S. as they inform media, elections, and policymaking.
Instructors: Keith Andrew Wailoo
Imagining New York: The City in Fiction
This Freshman Seminar will explore the wide variety of ways in which the fiction of New York City embraces the diversity, possibilities, and realities of American life. Our exploration will include novels of immigration and high society and supernatural horror, historical tales and works of science fiction, and memoirs and graphic narratives - all of which share a commitment to exposing the dynamics of a city that embodies both the best possibilities of the American Dream of transformation and the cruel realities of poverty, racism, and social injustice.
Instructors: Alfred Bendixen
Immigration Debates in the United States
This seminar is a course in policy analysis and journalism writing, focusing on immigration from Latin America to the United States. We will explore the historical and social factors that have made immigration a bitterly divisive issue, as context to examine current policies of the Trump administration. Reporting and writing assignments will allow students to explore immigration realities in and around Princeton, and to practice different voices of journalism, from neutral news prose to opinion editorials to tweet blasts. We will consider the role of journalists in contributing to fact-finding in the polarized national debate.
Instructors: Julia Drury Preston
International Trade
This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade and foreign direct investment. We investigate why nations trade, what they trade, and who gains and who loses from trade. We then focus on economic and political motives for countries to restrict or regulate international trade and study the economic effects of such policies. Topics include trade and wage inequality, labor migration, multinationals and outsourcing, multilateral trade negotiations, regional economic integration (and Brexit), trade policy in developing countries, and current trade and trade policy disputes.
Instructors: Silvia Weyerbrock
International Trade II
A continuation of ECO 551, with emphasis on current research issues. Topics vary from year to year.
Instructors: Eduardo Morales, Esteban A. Rossi-Hansberg

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Undergraduate Courses

African American History to 1863
Instructors: Tera W. Hunter
Architecture under the Sign of Catastrophe: Resilience and Resistance
Instructors: Anthony Vidler
Asian American Literature and Culture
Instructors: Paul Nadal
Black and Asian in America
Instructors: Kinohi Nishikawa
European Politics and Society in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Instructors: Marzenna James, Ezra N. Suleiman